10 Ways To Know If Your Child May Have A Learning Disability

One in five school aged children has a learning disability, according to a 2017 study from the National Center for Learning Disabilities. Almost 50% of parents believe children will outgrow their difficulties and an astonishing 33% of educators believe that what is classified as a learning disability is really just “laziness.”

One in five school aged children has a learning disability, according to a 2017 study from the National Center for Learning Disabilities. Almost 50% of parents believe children will outgrow their difficulties and an astonishing 33% of educators believe that what is classified as a learning disability is really just “laziness.”

Here are 10 ways you can identify if your child may have a learning disability – and help you navigate next steps to get your child the assistance they need.

1. Difficulty speaking, reading, and/or writing.  Delayed speech, language and motor development - including poor coordination - can be the initial hint a parent needs to keep an eye out in the future.

2. Not doing as well as they should be academically.  If you feel your child should be doing better in school than they are – this is a telltale sign they need support.

3. Poor reading of words.  Assuming your child has had enough exposure learning to sound out words, if your child still isn’t putting words together fluently by 2nd grade, this is an indicator that something else might be at play.

4. Reading the words on a page but not understanding what they are reading.  If your child can read with ease but doesn’t understand what he/she is reading (i.e. identifying the “main idea” or making inferences) this can be sign of an issue.

5. Difficulty learning math.  Math is simple for some but not for others. This alone does not constitute an issue but is something to look out for in context.

6. Not following directions.  Again, alone this is not indicative of anything but in the context of the other items on the list, it may be an indicator of something else at play.

7. Lack of interest or fear of school.  If your child consistently doesn’t want to go to school, there is always a reason – and it may be academic.

8. Focus and organizational weaknesses. All children lose focus or “tune out” sometimes in school, but when this is recurring, it can be an indicator.

9. Poor coordination.  Delayed coordination skills may negatively impact handwriting. If your child is putting forth the effort and not progressing, this is something to pay attention to.

10. Recall and memory deficits.  Poor memory and recall can have a devastating impact on a child’s performance in school. For example, a teacher just read a story and has a discussion on the topic, then quizzes the students. Those with poor memory / recall are at loss.

If you think that your child is exhibiting a number of these issues, do not lose heart. There is help and it’s never too late to get your child on track.  I am available for private evaluations, for more information please contact me either by phone 732.780.5060 or email LDTC2@aol.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Elizabeth Molinari DeFusco has been in practice for almost 40 years and has worked with hospitals, legal teams, schools, and Child Study Teams in the Tri-State area both as a Speech Pathologist and an Educational Consultant. As a graduate of Columbia University, she went on to study at Georgian Court University where she received her credentials as a Learning Disability Teacher Consultant. Mrs. DeFusco, known by her students as “Mrs. Bette” also holds certifications in Elementary Education as well as Teacher of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. She is board certified by the American Speech and Language Association and holds a New Jersey license.

Mrs. DeFusco or “Mrs. Bette” has been an educator since 1977 with an exemplary background in treating and caring for children and young adults with minor to severe learning issues. With her unique educational background, Mrs. DeFusco specializes in a variety of speech and language disabilities such as apraxia as well as dyslexia, reading comprehension, and auditory processing issues. She uses evidence-based techniques and cutting-edge technology programs to supply an individualized program for your child

As the founder of The DeFusco Center for Dynamic Learning,  a regional learning center in Central New Jersey, Mrs. Bette has made it her mission to help children with all levels of learning disabilities grow to their fullest potential.  Read more about our success stories by clicking here.